23 September 2009

Coming Library Holds.

Shannon: A Novel, by Frank Delaney.

Synopsis from B&N.com: A stirring new novel about an American priest’s journey through the heart of Ireland, from the New York Times bestselling author of Ireland and Tipperary.

In the summer of 1922 Robert Shannon, a young American priest, is shell-shocked by his experiences as a chaplain with the Marines, and then further disheartened when he witnesses corruption in the Boston Archdiocese. Sensing trouble, his mentor dispatches Robert to the land of his ancestors with the hope that the discovery of his family roots will restore the young priest’s equilibrium. Stepping ashore on the bank of the river that bears his family name, Robert is immediately thrust in to Ireland’s deepest issues, as a civil war has just begun.

Random Acts of Heroic Love, by Danny Scheinmann.

Synopsis from B&N.com: With over 200,000 copies sold in the UK, a Richard & Judy pick, rights sold in 19 countries, called “riveting” and “mesmerizing,” this is a cinematic debut from a gifted new writer. Based on real family events, Danny Scheinmann’s novel paints a dramatic portrait of two epic love stories.
1992: Traveling through South America with his girlfriend, Leo wakes up in a hopsital to find his girlfriend is dead. He blames himself for the tragedy and is sucked into a spiral of despair. But a surprising secret leads Leo to discover something that will change his life forever.
1917: Moritz is a POW fugitve, with seven thousand kilometers of the Russian steppes separating him from his first love, whose memory has kept him alive through carnage and captivity. The war may be over, but he now faces a perilous journey and the insecurity of whether his love is still waiting.

We Have Always Lived at the Castle, by Shirley Jackson.

(I found this last night at Regular Rumination's blog, and I had to check it out from the library right away!)

Synopsis from B&N.com: Taking readers deep into a labyrinth of dark neurosis, We Have Always Lived in the Castle is a deliciously unsettling novel about a perverse, isolated, and possibly murderous family and the struggle that ensues when a cousin arrives at their estate.

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